The Archives

THE ARCHIVES

History

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Before The Watch even existed, a band of monks kept an archive of strange artifacts they deemed holy, possessed or tainted by the devil. Galway was too far and too strategically unimportant to be the site of raids by conquering armies, so it was considered safe. They built caverns deep underground and began stockpiling strange items. Monks would go on pilgrimages to retrieve tainted or supernatural artifacts, to keep them out of the wrong hands. They cataloged their observations about the items in giant tomes. Despite their best efforts, many of those records were lost.

The monks who created the archive came to be known as The Lost Order. The archive was only rediscovered by the Galway Watch in the 1980s. An agent had a vision, which led to exploration of Galway's underground. They located the archive, and discovered that there was something about the rocks that rendered any supernatural artifacts inert while in the cavern.

A team of academics got to work, cataloging the artifacts and computerizing what records had survived. For many years, the Archive and Watch HQ were separate entities. The main base of the Watch was still in a warehouse in Claddagh. After the Claddagh Raid and the clash with the military, the Watch moved its headquarters to the underground caverns and converted additional rooms for its use.

Current activities

Watch branches from all over the world send their artifacts to be cataloged and studied. Given Galway's out-of-the-way location and the nature of the rocks that renders the artifacts inert, makes it an ideal storage space. Academics that were Touched find themselves at-home here. There's work to be done not only with new artifacts arriving all the time, but also with cataloging the older artifacts, many which haven't been touched in hundreds of years.

Newer artifacts are stored in storage lockers with data logged on computers. The further you go back, the less comprehensive the storage system, until there's simply artifacts sitting on shelves carved into rock walls with tags made of parchment that tend to disintegrate when touched.

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